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A Key for Contractor Marketing Success

Contractor MarketingSpeak Your Customers’ Language

Have you ever gone into a store to buy a computer, only to be totally baffled by the vocabulary of the salesperson? You think you know what you want, but all of a sudden the salesperson is slinging terminology and acronyms around you’ve never heard of and you’re left feeling “less than brilliant” about your proposed purchase.

A lot of people feel the same way when they talk to a building contractor or look for information online. Sometimes they feel like they don’t even know how to ask the right questions.

When potential customers look for your services online, they may not use the same terminology that you do. They’re not builders—they’re homeowners. That means they use homeowner language to describe what they’re looking for.

Why is that important? Here are a couple of reasons:

Getting Found

When people look for information about building or remodeling today, they don’t pull out the phonebook. They go to the Internet. They probably go to a search engine such as Google© and start typing in keywords. If the words they use to describe what they are looking for are dramatically different than the words you use to describe your services, they may not find you. That’s what’s essentially behind organic Search Engine Optimization (SEO). The search engines try to match the words that people type with content on various websites. The more your website content matches the words that people use to search—the more often they’ll end up on your website.

Gaining Trust

Let’s go back to the illustration of buying a computer. If the salesperson can’t communicate in terms of how the computer is going to help you, you’re probably not going to buy it. Worse yet, if the sales person makes you feel like an idiot (deliberately or not), you’re probably not going to buy from him or her (even if you later decide to buy). But if that same salesperson talks about what the computer can do for you—in terms that make sense for you—there’s a much better likelihood that you will (eventually) end up making a purchase. And you’ll want to purchase it from someone who understands how you want to use it.

So speaking your customers’ language helps them find you in the first place, and then helps you gain their trust—and even their business.

Contractor Marketing